swiss work permit

Swiss Asset Management Takes a New Turn in 2020

 

From January 1, 2020. The Swiss Financial Institutions Act (FinIA) and the Swiss Financial Services Act (FinSA) entered into force, updating the regulatory regime for trustees working in Switzerland. This means that all independent portfolio managers (PMs) and trustees subject to supervision under FinIA will have to be supervised by a Supervised organisations (SO) authorised by FINMA and get licensed by FINMA before they can be able to carry out their activities as financial intermediaries in Switzerland.

 

Cost of living in Switzerland

The cost of living in Switzerland is among the highest in the world, with the main cities Zurich and Geneva being named in the top 15 most expensive cities in the world in a 2019 study. On the other hand, Swiss salaries and the living standards are also among the highest in the world, which is the main reason why you should consider Switzerland a perfect location for work and living a quality life.
 

Investment climate in Switzerland

The Swiss economy is, according to the ratings made by international specialized institutions, among the most competitive, innovative and liberal. The main features that give Switzerland a privileged business environment, tailored to high- quality products and services are the excellent level of security offered by business law, long-term stability of the investment framework, full guarantee of property rights, fair competition, and banking secrecy.

Swiss residency – what are the advantages of obtaining a Swiss residence permit?

If you are not a Swiss citizen, you need a Swiss residency permit to live in Switzerland for a period longer than 3 months. A tourist visa will only allow you a 3-month stay. There are various types of permits and different ways to get them—it all depends on what you want to do in Switzerland.

Employment in Switzerland

With a stable economy, Swiss unemployment rate is one of the lowest in the world, standing at 3.7 percent in January 2017, with average unemployment typically lower in German-speaking Switzerland (3.1 percent) than in French and Italian-speaking Swiss cantons (5 percent).